Chronic Trypanosoma congolense infections in mice cause a sustained disruption of the B-cell homeostasis in the bone marrow and spleen.

TitleChronic Trypanosoma congolense infections in mice cause a sustained disruption of the B-cell homeostasis in the bone marrow and spleen.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsObishakin, E., C. De Trez, and S. Magez
JournalParasite Immunol
Volume36
Issue5
Pagination187-98
Date Published2014 May
ISSN1365-3024
KeywordsAnimals, Antibodies, Protozoan, B-Lymphocytes, Bone Marrow, Bone Marrow Cells, Cell Count, Female, Homeostasis, Immunoglobulin G, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Parasitemia, Spleen, Trypanosoma congolense, Trypanosomiasis, African, Variant Surface Glycoproteins, Trypanosoma, Virulence
Abstract

Trypanosoma congolense is one of the main species responsible for Animal African Trypanosomosis (AAT). As preventive vaccination strategies for AAT have been unsuccessful so far, investigating the mechanisms underlying vaccine failure has to be prioritized. In T. brucei and T. vivax infections, recent studies revealed a rapid onset of destruction of the host B-cell compartment, resulting in the loss of memory recall capacity. To assess such effect in experimental T. congolense trypanosomosis, we performed infections with both the cloned Tc13 parasite, which is considered as a standard model system for T. congolense rodent infections and the noncloned TRT55 field isolate. These infections differ in their virulence level in the C57BL/6 mouse model for trypanosomosis. We show that early on, an irreversible depletion of all developmental B cells stages occur. Subsequently, in the spleen, a detrimental decrease in immature B cells is followed by a significant and permanent depletion of Marginal zone B cells and Follicular B cells. The severity of these events later on in infection correlated with the virulence level of the parasite stock. In line with this, it was observed that later-stage infection-induced IgGs were largely nonspecific, in particular in the more virulent TRT55 infection model.

DOI10.1111/pim.12099
Alternate JournalParasite Immunol.
PubMed ID24451010
subject_category: 
Research group: